SHOP $180, adidas.com


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I own one pair of heavy-duty high-top hiking boots that I’ve had for about twelve years now. I still vividly remember my heels, bleeding viciously, for the multiple weeks it took me to initially break them in. So many band-aids, so much pain. I suppose some tough hikers might say that’s just part of the game, and tell me to buck up. But, I’ll let you in on a secret: Technical hiking shoes without a break-in period exist. You don’t need to bleed or clunk around in thick heavy soles to be able to go for a hike. You do not even have to own shoes that look like traditional hiking shoes in order to go for a hike. My fellow casual, style-minded hikers, let me introduce you to the Adidas Terrex Free Hiker 2.0.

SHOP $180, huckberry.com

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JOE LINGEMAN

Let’s talk versatility (and style).

Most people will tell you that you can’t wear hiking shoes to the office, a bar, or around the neighborhood for a walk. And most people would be right about that, but not the Free Hiker. These Terrex shoes are minimalist enough to take you most everywhere, especially in our current moment, where Gore-Tex and outdoor gear is the most fashionable footwear choice as it is. These are killer sneakers—lightweight, waterproof, comfortable, with great traction—regardless of whether you’re in the city running errands on a rainy day or out on a weekend day hike. And what if you’re traveling, and might mix a more mountainous excursion into the itinerary? You’ll still only need to bring one pair of shoes.

SHOP $180, huckberry.com

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JOE LINGEMAN

A real low profile with high support.

There is obviously a level of hiking difficulty that warrants the high-top version of this shoe. (Might I add, the sock-like knit on the high-top Free Hiker should save you from having a bad blistering experience like my own.) But if your hiking forays are, like mine, not on the extreme side, a low-top shoe works just fine. My ankle felt firmly locked in place while hiking in the Free Hiker, and these shoes are durable and tough against the elements. Plus, the first day I wore them, nary a band-aid was needed despite five hours straight on my feet. I would suggest sizing half a size down though, as they do run slightly big.

SHOP $180, huckberry.com

a pair of socks

JOE LINGEMAN

The Ultraboost hype is real.

Before I owned these shoes, I’d see people on the street in shoes with Adidas’s signature Ultraboost sole and think “Damn, that thing looks bouncy.” Now I can confirm, that they are in fact comfortable beyond belief, and the foam is next-level supportive and adds an extra layer of cushion. Every step on the trail has a little extra pep, like a tiny personal trampoline—responsive, but not too squishy. They’re also ultra-light, with absolutely none of the clunkiness that comes with a traditional hiking boot. (This is also huge if you need to pack ’em for travel.) If you’re already a fan of Adidas’s Ultraboost runners, you’ll love the familiar cushioning of these. They are really, truly comfortable for a day on your feet, from the car to the airport to the trail, and of course to the bar afterwards for a celebratory beer.

SHOP $180, huckberry.com


Photography by Joe Lingeman. Prop styling by Heather Greene.

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